Zinnatullina Z.

Imitating the documentary in the dilogy “Yes, Minister” and “Yes, Prime Minister” by Jonathan Lynn and Anthony Jay

Abstract: 

The paper is devoted to the dilogy “Yes, Minister” and “Yes, Prime Minister” by English scriptwriters Jonathan Lynn and Anthony Jay who write about a fictional British politician Jim Hacker. The characteristic feature of the work is that it is based on the popular sitcom, which was shown on the BBC2 Channel in 1981–1984 and 1986–1988. Therefore, it refers to such a type of literary work as novelization. The genre of the dilogy can be defined as a mockumentary, as these works are a mere imitation of the documentary. The work is based on Jim Hacker’s diaries allegedly received for publication by editors. We can trace the evolution of the hero through the change in the style of the narrative. The book includes memoirs of the minister’s staff, which allow the reader to look at the events from a different angle. In addition to the diary form, the authors use office notes, which perform the function of a means of communication and the code of British officials. One of the main objects of derision is mass media. The authors criticize their desire to make news out of nothing, as well as bargaining with the authorities. Interviews, articles and headlines, included in the books, also create a satirical effect.

Key words: 

scriptwriting, mockumentary, novelization, imitation of the documentary, English literature.

The system of images in Ruth Jhabvala’s novel “Heat and Dust”

Abstract: 

Ruth Jhabvala was one of the most famous English writers in the 1960–1970s. She is the only person to have won both a Booker Prize and an Oscar. She spent most of her life in India, consequently, the main theme of her novels is the relationship between the East and the West. This paper considers Ruth Jhabvala’s novel “Heat and Dust” (1975). We analyze the system of images, which illustrates the author’s position with respect to the above mentioned issue. The action takes place in two time layers: colonial and postcolonial periods. However, there are no changes in the small Indian town of Satipur. It seems that time stands still there. This situation is realized through the dual motif of the two main female characters: Olivia and the narrator herself whose name we will never know. The latter practically repeats the life of Olivia. We can single out a group of characters who lose their real identity, trying to become a part of another civilization. These characters are found both in the East and in the West.

Key words: 

Ruth Jhabvala, colonial discourse, postcolonialism, India, English literature.

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